Life in Lockdown

Sucks, doesn’t it?

Being stuck in the house all day, every day. Can’t go out to dinner, can’t go to a movie, can’t go to a ballgame, can’t go anywhere, basically.

Can’t go to work, cause I’m a driver with nobody to drive. Got laid off, as a result, so I’m another one of the many newly unemployed folks in our country. Thank goodness my wife still has her job and can work from home, as everyone is encouraged to do who can.

Just stay home and order out and get caught up on TV shows. My wife and I got started on Manifest; interesting show.

I don’t like it, friends, but this is our reality. This is what COVID-19 has wrought.

And honestly, if this is as bad as it gets for me, I’ll be very thankful.

This illness is touching a lot of lives, and I’m so scared it will touch someone in my family, or among my friends.

And it scares me that they will die alone and be buried alone, just because of its potential for spreading. That’s just heartbreaking.

My heart goes out to the people on the front lines of this war, doctors and nurses and health care workers, some giving their lives in the fight to save others. I cannot thank you enough for your compassion and courage. Bless every one of you.

Same for all the people working in the grocery stores, doing their best to keep the shelves stocked, in spite of all the greedy folks who have to hoard stuff so other people have no shot at getting any. Shame on you. A little less selfishness would go a long way, here.

And anyone else out there doing whatever they can to help us get through this, thank you so very much.

I don’t know when we’ll turn the corner on this thing; it could be a long while, yet. And while that’s discouraging, even depressing, we must all do what we’re asked to keep it from getting worse. Please.

This is unlike anything our generation has ever faced before. It’s time for us to prove what we’re really made of.

Do your part. Stay home. I recommend Manifest.

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Points USA

I found this list on the blog, Coalition of the Brave, which is appropriate. Contacting anyone on it is an act of bravery. Thanks to darthtimon for putting this together, along with ones for the UK and Australia. Use them if you need them; there is no shame. Be well. – Larry

Coalition of the Brave

Do You Need To Talk To Someone?

If you or someone you know is in crisis, pleasecall 911, go to the nearest emergency room, call1-800-273-TALK(8255) to reach a 24-hour crisis center, ortext MHA to 741741at the Crisis Text Line.

You can also call 1-800-985-5990 or text “TalkWithUs” to 66746 at the SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline. Trained crisis workers will listen to you and direct you to the resources you need.

Suicide Hotline Phone Numbers

If you feel suicidal or you’re in a crisis situation and need immediate assistance, people at these suicide hotlines in the U.S. are there to help. We have additionalsuicide information and resourceshere.

  • 1-800-273-8255 (1-800-273-TALK) – National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
  • 1-800-784-2433 (1-800-SUICIDE) – National Hopeline Network
  • 1-866-488-7386 (1-866-4.U.TREVOR aimed at gay and questioning youth)

Just a note: These are resources that we have come across that may prove helpful…

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I Couldn’t Say It Better

 

This poem by Lawrence Ferlinghetti, written ten years before trump’s election, couldn’t have been more prophetic.

 

PITY THE NATION

(After Khalil Gibran)

Pity the nation whose people are sheep
And whose shepherds mislead them
Pity the nation whose leaders are liars
Whose sages are silenced
And whose bigots haunt the airwaves
Pity the nation that raises not its voice
Except to praise conquerers
And acclaim the bully as hero
And aims to rule the world
By force and by torture
Pity the nation that knows
No other language but its own
And no other culture but its own
Pity the nation whose breath is money
And sleeps the sleep of the too well fed
Pity the nation oh pity the people
who allow their rights to erode
and their freedoms to be washed away
My country, tears of thee
Sweet land of liberty!

 — Lawrence Ferlinghetti
San Francisco, January, 2006

Like it Was Yesterday

 

(Three years ago, I submitted this post in remembrance of the events of 9/11. Today, I offer it again, updated, on the 18th anniversary of the day that changed us forever. Never forget…)

 

Eighteen years ago…
The brilliant cerulean skies over Manhattan
Suddenly, shockingly were interrupted
By the smoke from a misguided burnt offering,
Offered by impassioned false prophets
To a Prophet they never really knew.

Eighteen years ago…
A throng of innocent, ordinary faces
Stared in utter horror and disbelief
At the face of death, approaching them swiftly
In the guise of a great, winged demon,
Its once perfectly resplendent skin
Now engulfed in the flames of Hell,
The air redolent of burning flesh and jet fuel.

And then – this time, before a captive audience – it happened again.

Eighteen years ago…
Desperate, hopeless, sorrowful voices
Left tearful, heartfelt goodbyes
On cold and sterile answering machines
For the ones they would leave behind
To play back again, and again, and again,
Frozen in their grief, their loneliness, their rage,
With merely a voice to hold through the long, sleepless night.

Eighteen years ago…
Knights in shining armor ascended,
Disappearing into the smoky blackness,
Staring down fear, resolute in their mission
To rescue those who were helpless,
Only to become helpless, themselves
As the once proud and mighty towers
Crumbled spectacularly to the ground,
And we witnessed the Baptism of Dust.

Eighteen years ago…
Another winged demon crashed into a Pentagon,
And still another into a pastoral Pennsylvanian field,
And we all shook our heads in shock and bewilderment and terror,
As we helplessly watched what we believed
To surely be the beginning of The End.

Eighteen years ago…
I saw grown men weeping openly:
Television news anchors, stoic and detached,
Now utterly flattened by the sheer relentlessness
Of report after stupefying report
And image upon horrible, graphic image;
Police and firefighters, hearts irreparably shattered
By the overwhelming number of fallen comrades
Who sacrificed everything in upholding
Their sworn, sacred duty;
Business executives who lost scores of dedicated employees,
Just ordinary people, going about their ordinary work,
Gone, all gone;
Office workers, pained with guilt
Over deciding not to go to work that day,
And resolved to earn every subsequent day of life given to them.

Eighteen years ago…
I heard “The Star-Spangled Banner”
Played, of all places,
In front of England’s Buckingham Palace
At the ceremonial Changing of the Guard,
In a remarkably touching display of sympathy and solidarity.
I heard Congressmen, gathered on the Capitol steps
Performing an impromptu, earnest and defiant rendition
Of “God Bless America”…

And I felt the embrace of the world.

Eighteen years ago…
So many other things happened that September day;
So many acts of courage, of strength,
Of sacrifice, of compassion.
Of Love.

And eighteen years later, I remember it all,
Just like…

 

 

A Month to Save a Life

 

September is National Suicide Prevention Month in America.

Two years ago this month, I wrote a series of posts on this topic, “A Ray of Light”, Parts 1-4. I invite you to read them if this is something that concerns you or someone you know. I shared information about the signs a person may be suicidal, what to do for someone who is, and who to contact for help.

This means something to me. I myself have had suicidal thoughts in the past, and came close to doing it once, and I lost an uncle to it many years ago.

It still registers as a national health crisis, as often as it occurs, and it’s getting worse. The statistics bear that out.

And I have to ask, why is that so? Where are we failing these people?

Is word not getting out that help is available? Is suicide still too uncomfortable a subject to mention in public?

Well, how comfortable are we with all these people killing themselves?

Folks, we have to talk about this more. We need to be perceptive around our friends and family. We need to not be ashamed to ask for help. We need to not hesitate to ask to help.

During this month that focuses on suicide, let’s all make it our focus. It’s extremely important. We’ve got to get a handle on this. Way too many precious lives are needlessly lost every year, every day. We can put an end to it.

Life can really suck sometimes, I know. But let’s all face it together. None of us has to alone. Please, reach out for help. Don’t give up.

 

I almost gave up 33 years ago. I’m glad it didn’t happen.