Goodbye, Old Friend


This could be an interesting week.

We’re getting rid of an old sofa at our house, and replacing it with two new rocker-recliner chairs.

The interesting part will be how my sofa-loving cat, Izzy, reacts to this change of scenery.


Believe me when I say, Izzy loves our sofa. For the entire 12 years we’ve had her and her sister, Lizzy, it’s been here, and she has enjoyed it.


Usually, she’s up top, behind my head, purring in my ear. She used to pace back and forth on it, demanding to be petted.

I think it’ll be hard for her to let go, after all these years. My wife and I feel kinda guilty about it. 🙁 Hopefully, she’ll adapt to the new furniture before long, and get up behind my head again.

I’ll be there waiting. Silly kitty.

Life in Lockdown

Sucks, doesn’t it?

Being stuck in the house all day, every day. Can’t go out to dinner, can’t go to a movie, can’t go to a ballgame, can’t go anywhere, basically.

Can’t go to work, cause I’m a driver with nobody to drive. Got laid off, as a result, so I’m another one of the many newly unemployed folks in our country. Thank goodness my wife still has her job and can work from home, as everyone is encouraged to do who can.

Just stay home and order out and get caught up on TV shows. My wife and I got started on Manifest; interesting show.

I don’t like it, friends, but this is our reality. This is what COVID-19 has wrought.

And honestly, if this is as bad as it gets for me, I’ll be very thankful.

This illness is touching a lot of lives, and I’m so scared it will touch someone in my family, or among my friends.

And it scares me that they will die alone and be buried alone, just because of its potential for spreading. That’s just heartbreaking.

My heart goes out to the people on the front lines of this war, doctors and nurses and health care workers, some giving their lives in the fight to save others. I cannot thank you enough for your compassion and courage. Bless every one of you.

Same for all the people working in the grocery stores, doing their best to keep the shelves stocked, in spite of all the greedy folks who have to hoard stuff so other people have no shot at getting any. Shame on you. A little less selfishness would go a long way, here.

And anyone else out there doing whatever they can to help us get through this, thank you so very much.

I don’t know when we’ll turn the corner on this thing; it could be a long while, yet. And while that’s discouraging, even depressing, we must all do what we’re asked to keep it from getting worse. Please.

This is unlike anything our generation has ever faced before. It’s time for us to prove what we’re really made of.

Do your part. Stay home. I recommend Manifest.

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Points USA

I found this list on the blog, Coalition of the Brave, which is appropriate. Contacting anyone on it is an act of bravery. Thanks to darthtimon for putting this together, along with ones for the UK and Australia. Use them if you need them; there is no shame. Be well. – Larry

Coalition of the Brave

Do You Need To Talk To Someone?

If you or someone you know is in crisis, pleasecall 911, go to the nearest emergency room, call1-800-273-TALK(8255) to reach a 24-hour crisis center, ortext MHA to 741741at the Crisis Text Line.

You can also call 1-800-985-5990 or text “TalkWithUs” to 66746 at the SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline. Trained crisis workers will listen to you and direct you to the resources you need.

Suicide Hotline Phone Numbers

If you feel suicidal or you’re in a crisis situation and need immediate assistance, people at these suicide hotlines in the U.S. are there to help. We have additionalsuicide information and resourceshere.

  • 1-800-273-8255 (1-800-273-TALK) – National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
  • 1-800-784-2433 (1-800-SUICIDE) – National Hopeline Network
  • 1-866-488-7386 (1-866-4.U.TREVOR aimed at gay and questioning youth)

Just a note: These are resources that we have come across that may prove helpful…

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Calling All Geezers

 

Hey, all you old buzzards out there! Concerned about climate change, but feel at a loss for what to do about it?

Let me introduce you to Elders Climate Action (https://eldersclimateaction.org), a nationwide network of senior citizens who want to have a part in influencing policy changes in our government regarding climate change.

As I have said on here before, I believe climate change is THE biggest issue we face today, because all the other issues mean nothing if none of us are here. And that’s where we’re headed, if we don’t make some large-scale changes ASAP to our climate policy.

Elders Climate Action is an aggregation of parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles united in doing everything we can (yes, we; I’m a very new member) to assure this planet is still inhabitable for future generations. You can be as active as you are able and willing, whether you get out in your community, or never leave your home, there’s something you can do.

I encourage all of you to check out their website and see if, like me, you decide Elders Climate Action is something you want to be part of. But, even if not, maybe what you see there will inspire you to take some action, big or small, in the fight against climate change.

The kids need us. Let’s do this for them. Thank you.

 

 

You Want Them Here Forever

 

One of the bad things about getting older is, everyone else gets older, too.

And the people you love the most, who are older than you, who have always been in your life…

…eventually pass away.

And an essential part of your life is now gone.

You feel deeply hurt and, for a while, a little disoriented.

Your constellation looks different now; there’s a star missing.

And it upsets your sense of order. You want all these precious people who have always been here, to always stay here, defying the inevitable, because you don’t know life without them, nor do you want to.

And you know this is how life is; it’s just the natural order of things. But you still hate it.

 

My wife lost an aunt this week, one that she knew and dearly loved all her life.

Her passing wasn’t that unexpected; she’d been in poor health. But of course, that doesn’t make losing her hurt any less.

I met her 37 years ago, back when my wife was my girlfriend, even before I met my future in-laws. She was a wonderful lady, a terrific sister, wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. She loved her family wholeheartedly, and took care of them the best she could.

I know everyone who knew her will miss her. Like I said at the beginning, letting go of someone you love is always hard, and the older you get, the more letting go you have to do.

And memories, as much as they will sustain you in the future, feel woefully inadequate in the immediate sorrow and grief.

And that’s where family comes in. We cry on each other, hold each other up, affirm our love for each other and for the one who has left.

And we all just go on, considering ourselves so lucky for having known that special someone.

 

Love you, Geneva. You’re one of the best people I ever knew. Rest In Peace.