Treadmills

 

These are the days of the open hand
They will not be the last
Look around now
These are the days of the beggars and the choosers

This is the year of the hungry man
Whose place is in the past
Hand in hand with ignorance
And legitimate excuses

The rich declare themselves poor
And most of us are not sure
If we have too much
But we’ll take our chances
‘Cause God’s stopped keeping score
I guess somewhere along the way
He must have let us all out to play
Turned his back and all God’s children
Crept out the back door

And it’s hard to love, there’s so much to hate
Hanging on to hope
When there is no hope to speak of
And the wounded skies above say it’s much, much too late
Well maybe we should all be praying for time

These are the days of the empty hand
Oh you hold on to what you can
And charity is a coat you wear twice a year

This is the year of the guilty man
Your television takes a stand
And you find that what was over there is over here

So you scream from behind your door
Say what’s mine is mine and not yours
I may have too much but I’ll take my chances
‘Cause God’s stopped keeping score
And you cling to the things they sold you
Did you cover your eyes when they told you
That he can’t come back
‘Cause he has no children to come back for

It’s hard to love there’s so much to hate
Hanging on to hope when there is no hope to speak of
And the wounded skies above say it’s much too late
So maybe we should all be praying for time

“Praying for Time,” George Michael

 

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The late, great George Michael sang those words in 1990. Scary, how relevant they sound now.

Since the 80’s pop superstar’s untimely death at 53, on Christmas Day, this song, from his superb album, Listen Without Prejudice, has been playing endlessly in my head.  I highly recommend listening to it, if you never have. It’s a powerful piece.

I won’t pretend I understand everything he said in it, but a good part of it is pretty hard to misinterpret. Especially, in light of our current circumstance.

It amazes me how many songs speak, not only to their times, but to ours. They serve as sobering reminders of how little progress we human beings have really made in how we treat each other.

We just stay on our treadmill, walking endlessly and getting absolutely nowhere.

What will it take to get us off that treadmill, and actually moving forward?

What will it take for you?

Gracias Beaucoup

 

Aaaaaand, it’s over. Just like that.

So much buildup, so much shopping, decorating, baking, wrapping, and now, we’re done. Happens every year.

But, I hope yesterday was lots of fun for you. It was for me.

Now, it’s time to go return all those gifts you said were “just what you’ve always wanted!” It’s also time for another post-Christmas tradition that, I believe, is rapidly dying out:

Writing, and sending, thank-you notes.

That’s right, kids, back in ye olden days, we wrote thank-you notes to everyone who gave us a present for Christmas, including Santa.

I don’t know, do kids do that anymore? Writing, I mean? On paper? With a pen?

Who knows? Anyway…

Here’s my chance to send a thank-you note to you. All of you wonderful people who gave me the gift of your attention this year, even if it was just to look in on one post. Just the fact that you took the time to visit this blog means a lot to me, so thank you for checking in to see what I wrote. I hope you enjoyed your visit, and you’re welcome to come back anytime, as often as you want. I will try to keep making it worth it for you.

We have, to understate, a very interesting year ahead, and we all need to gear up for it. The incoming administration is going to require our constant vigilance, and participation in the process of governing this nation.

If you can’t come up with any New Year’s resolution, I think that would be as good as any.

Again, thanks so much for stopping by. I appreciate it. Y’all come back now, you hear?

Please, Stand By

 

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No, I haven’t fallen off the edge of the earth.

I know you haven’t heard from me for awhile, and I know you’re just panting with anticipation for my next brilliant post (ahem), and I do have some subjects I want to address. Many, in fact. My mind is jammed with them.

I just haven’t had the time lately to organize my thoughts on those subjects into anything articulate, and I don’t want to simply throw stuff helter-shelter out there; we all know, there’s enough of that going on, already.

So, meanwhile, let me just take this opportunity to wish all of you a VERY Merry Christmas. Have fun with your family; cherish the time you have with them. Safe travels to those of you leaving town for the holidays. Save all receipts, to facilitate easier returning of gifts. 😉 Go easy on the freakin’ eggnog. Make sure you got plenty of batteries.

And enjoy the holidays; that’s what they’re for.

Deck the halls, y’all.

P.S. – That’s Lizzy under the tree, hoping someone gets her for Christmas! 🐱🎄

Election Statement

Never done a reblog before, but thought this was worth it. Hope you do, as well.

Lori Greer in Portland

diocese-of-oregon

I was strengthened, comforted and challenged to read the words below in our church newsletter.

To me, this statement is a call to action that any person of any persuasion, religious or not, can follow.  

View original post 212 more words

I’ll Be Home For Christmas

 

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War, I despise ’cause it means destruction of innocent lives.

“War”, Edwin Starr

SONGWRITERS
Strong, Barrett / Whitfield, Norman J.

 

The classic Christmas ballad, I’ll Be Home For Christmas, was released around Christmas time in 1943, and became a huge hit for singer Bing Crosby.

The song, which speaks of wishing to be home with family for the holidays, complete with “snow and mistletoe, and presents on the tree,” wasn’t originally written from the point of view of a soldier stationed overseas, but quickly took on that meaning, since it was released during wartime. For many of the servicemen, the only way to get back home for Christmas was “only in my dreams.”

Two years earlier, and 75 years ago today, Japanese forces made sure that over two thousand servicemen stationed at Pearl Harbor would not be home for Christmas. Any Christmas.

 

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Imagine how December 25, 1941 must have been for the families of all those lost just eighteen days before.

It’s a pain that has been experienced through our history. From the American Revolution to the present, over a million Americans have died in battle. That’s a lot of families through the decades, suddenly overwhelmed with an enormous loss. Their beloved soldier would not be home for Christmas…or ever.

Now, I know there are plenty of other people who, for whatever reason, are separated from their loved ones at Christmas time. I’m not ignoring them, or belittling their circumstances. (Not intentionally, at least.) That especially goes for all the victims of violence – gun violence, mainly – and their bereaved, devastated families.

But, on this somber anniversary, my thoughts go to all those who have been separated, temporarily or permanently, by the harsh reality of war. I’m not going to debate the rights and wrongs of war here, other than to say, I hate what it does to families.

And not just American families.

So, here’s a few Christmas wishes, from a grateful civilian:

To all of you military men and women, spending Christmas somewhere far from home, thank you for your service. I wish you were here, too. Come home soon, and safe. Merry Christmas.🎄 🎁

To all of you celebrating Christmas while waiting for your loved ones to come home, thank you for the sacrifices you make. May they return soon for a joyful reunion.

 

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And to all of you facing, again or for the first time, the unbearable pain of never seeing another Christmas with that mom or dad, that son or daughter, that brother or sister, that husband or wife, that special person…

 

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My heart goes out to you. You are going through grief of a magnitude many of us will never know. I am so very sorry. I wish you love and comfort in your sorrow.

And to everyone, Peace on Earth.