Get These Guys a Dictionary


“So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights. All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here — a lynching. But we will WIN!

donald trump, tweeted 10/22/2019

 

“Sen. Lindsey Graham says he agrees with President Donald Trump that the Democratsimpeachment drive is like a lynching.

“The South Carolina Republican senator told reporters Tuesday that Trumps description is pretty well accurate, adding that the effort is a sham and a joke because the president doesnt know the identity of his accuser and the process is playing out in private.

“Graham told reporters on Capitol Hill that, This is a lynching in every sense. This is unAmerican.””

— Associated Press, 10/22/2019


LYNCH

verb (used with object)

  1. to put to death, especially by hanging, by mob action and without legal authority.

What am I missing?

Never. Not Once

This is great stuff. Read it and consider seriously what this gentleman is saying.

Note To My White Self

Note to my white self…

In light of the recent events at a Starbucks coffee shop, it seems prudent to understand what such incidents teach you as a white person.

You have never been asked to leave a coffee shop because you haven’t purchased a beverage yet.

You have never had a store clerk call the police to have you removed from the premises.

You have never been arrested for asking to use the restroom.

Never. Not once.

You have never had black men yell “Honky” and throw garbage at you from a passing vehicle.

You have never had a person cross to the other side of the street when they see you.

You have never had people stare right through you when you said “hello.”

You have never had someone tell you they hate you because of the color of your skin.

Never. Not once.

You have never had…

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I Need To Listen

Note To My White Self

Note to my white self…

You need to listen.

I know you don’t want to hear this, but – when it comes to discussions of racism with people of color – you have difficulty listening. You have convinced yourself that you are color blind, that you treat everyone equally regardless of the color of their skin and that any criticism you make of people of color is based on their behavior or attitudes and not their race.  So when a person of color says something about white people, you stop listening.  You don’t think they are talking about you.

They probably are.

You need to listen to people of color. They are experts when it comes to white people.  They have spent their entire lives surrounded by white people.  They don’t have to befriend a white person to understand them.  White people have been their teachers and their bosses.  They’ve watched us…

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The Truth in Black and White

 
If you want to make the world a better place
Take a look at yourself, and then make a change

“Man in the Mirror”, Michael Jackson

Songwriters
SIEDAH GARRETT, GLEN BALLARD

Published By
Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc., Universal Music Publishing Group

 

This is for all my nonwhite readers out there.

 

I was never brought up to hate people of color. I was taught we were all God’s children. As kids in church, we learned that song with the line, “Red and yellow, black and white, they are precious in His sight.” We’re all loved the same.

I’m aware of, and repulsed by, the atrocities committed against blacks throughout the long, bigoted history of this country, from slavery all the way to death by police shooting. I’m aware of the second-class treatment you receive in regards to such basic needs as housing, education and employment, and of the injustice of that.

I do not believe in a “superior” race, or class. I believe this whole “white supremacy” thing is bull$#!t. I believe in equality. You should have the same rights as me. You should have the same opportunities as me.

I believe in, and greatly admire, the nobility and courage of people like Rosa Parks, Jackie Robinson and Martin Luther King, Jr. I think it’s great this country elected a black man for President of the United States. Twice.

And, yet…

I’ve been part of the problem.

I’ve told the jokes. I’ve attached the stereotypes. I’ve used the derogatory names. (Always, behind your back.)

I’ve looked at you at times with condescension, at other times with suspicion. Even fear.

I’ve actually tried to ingratiate myself to you by talking like you, imitating you. (Got called out for that once, too.)

In short, while being strongly against systematic, institutionalized racism, I myself have been the definition of a racist. Which is something I never wanted to be.

And, it probably won’t surprise you to learn, I’ve treated people of various other races in much the same way.

I actually thought it was, for the most part, harmless. Hey, us white folks get made fun of too, right?

Yeah, that’s really lame, I know.

So, for me to then speak in outrage against the injustice of racism, without first owning what is in my own heart, would be highly hypocritical.

So, I’m owning it. Whatever I’ve said, done, thought or felt toward any member of a race other than my own that was insulting, demeaning or judgmental.

I’ve been part of the problem far too long. I’m ready to be part of the solution.

So, I sincerely apologize for, and renounce, my old racist ways. Though I know changing my attitudes won’t be flick-of-the-switch easy, I’m going to stay with it until my old bad habits are gone and replaced with new good ones.

I’m sure some of you may be skeptical about this resolution of mine, and I don’t blame you. All I can say is, I’m just taking Michael’s advice.

I hope a lot of us do. Nobody is born racist. It’s learned. It can be unlearned.

Peace.