Uncomfortable History Month: Hammer Time

I’m a day late reblogging this post, but it’s still essential reading for Black History Month. Even Black sports heroes are subject to unimaginable abuse. Larry

The Mind of Brosephus

Day five, and what better topic is there than the Hammer himself. On this date in 1934, the greatest player to ever wear an Atlanta Braves uniform was born in Mobile, Alabama. Henry Louis “Hank” Aaron would leave Mobile and go on to become the homerun king of Major League Baseball.

I could go on all day about his career, but we all are pretty familiar with his stats. What makes his career even more impressive is when you realize that he accomplished all he did while under constant threat to both himself and his family. Just as revisionism portrays Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr as someone who was supposedly beloved during his time on earth, Aaron wasn’t universally accepted and loved by America during his playing years.

I’ll give you just a few samples of the thousands upon thousands of hate letters he and the Braves organization received…

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Critical Race Theory is not about being anti-white

For those of you concerned about Critical Race Theory (CRT), here’s a quick and easy explanation from an authority on the subject. For your education.
Larry

IISWHITE

       I have been studying, writing, and teaching on the subject of whiteness and systemic racism— Critical Race Theory — for almost twenty years. For the critics and detractors, let me share with you what I know and what I do.  First and foremost, let me start with what Critical Race Theory (CRT) is not. It is not “white people bad” and “black people good”.  It is not about making the white kids feel personal shame or personal responsibility for all the injustices that Black and Brown people have suffered and continue to suffer. Never, in any classroom discussion is it argued that white people do not suffer.  No one is saying that all white people are rich or that white people do not know extreme poverty.   In fact, I try to avoid using the words “white privilege” and “white supremacy” because they are…

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A White Woman Listens … Really Listens

Imagine…a white person and a black person talking, not yelling, and coming together. Good lesson for us all.
Larry

Filosofa's Word

We have a serious problem in the U.S.:  we don’t listen to each other.  Okay, yes, we have many serious problems in the U.S. today, but many of them could be solved if we simply took time to listen … really listen … to each other and consider what the other person is saying.  Instead, we have preconceived ideas and, so sure that our own ideas are the right ones, we barely listen to those with opposing viewpoints, or from whom we might learn something.

Yesterday, I came across a Facebook post by a white woman who took the time to listen to a black man, who asked questions and pondered the answers, who learned from someone whose life experiences differ vastly from her own.  Her post has thus far received more than 220,000 views and some 182,000 shares.  I think this piece is well worth sharing, for we can…

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