The Deadly Consequences of One Lie — WriteSomeShit

White folks like me will never, ever fully understand what it means to be Black in these United States. It takes outstanding writers like Hannah Drake to bring me over to the window of my insular life to get a good look at the truth, and it’s as necessary as it is horrifying for us all to get a good look at it, make up our minds to do something about it, and go do it. Thank you very much, Hannah. Larry

Yesterday I learned about the suicide of Chris Wells, a leader in the Breonna Taylor Protests. I would rarely be at Injustice Square Park and not see Chris. He could not be missed -tall, slender, well dressed, often dawning sunglasses. He towered above others in the crowd, often with a megaphone in his hand. Some…

The Deadly Consequences of One Lie — WriteSomeShit

The Original

Sidney Poitier died Thursday at the age of 94.

Those of you who don’t recognize the name, look him up. He was a Big Deal.

He was a magnificent actor, who brought dignity to every role he played, from the schoolteacher in “To Sir, With Love”, to a police detective in “In the Heat of the Night”, to a handyman who builds a church for a group of nuns in “Lilies of the Field” a role for which he won a Best Actor Academy Award in 1964.

The Big Deal? He was the first Black actor to ever receive that award.

Courtesy Associated Press

The Big Deal? He was pretty much the only Black actor working in Hollywood at the time. As he once recalled, “I made films when the only other Black on the lot was the shoeshine boy. I was kind of the lone guy in town.”

In 1967, theater owners named him the Number One movie star, the first time a Black actor was so honored.

Sidney was the trailblazer, the one who paved the way for those who followed, like Danny Glover, James Earl Jones, Louis Gossett, Jr., Denzel Washington, Will Smith, Halle Berry and so many more.

He had a message for all those followers in 1992, in his acceptance speech for the American Film Institute Lifetime Achievement Award:

“Welcome, young Blacks. Those of us who go before you glance back with satisfaction and leave you with a simple trust: Be true to yourselves and be useful to the journey.”

Enjoy some Sidney Poitier movies this weekend; read about his early struggles that shaped him into the actor, and the man, he became.

He truly was a Big Deal.

A White Woman Listens … Really Listens

Imagine…a white person and a black person talking, not yelling, and coming together. Good lesson for us all.
Larry

Filosofa's Word

We have a serious problem in the U.S.:  we don’t listen to each other.  Okay, yes, we have many serious problems in the U.S. today, but many of them could be solved if we simply took time to listen … really listen … to each other and consider what the other person is saying.  Instead, we have preconceived ideas and, so sure that our own ideas are the right ones, we barely listen to those with opposing viewpoints, or from whom we might learn something.

Yesterday, I came across a Facebook post by a white woman who took the time to listen to a black man, who asked questions and pondered the answers, who learned from someone whose life experiences differ vastly from her own.  Her post has thus far received more than 220,000 views and some 182,000 shares.  I think this piece is well worth sharing, for we can…

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Wendell is Smiling

 

All right, let’s hear it for Darrell Wallace, Jr.

Which is who, you ask?

Oh, he just finished second in Sunday’s NASCAR Daytona 500 stock car race. In only his fifth ever career start, no less.

Second? Big deal, you say.

Well, it is, and here’s why: It’s the highest finish ever at Daytona by an African American driver.

Not that that list is a terribly long one. Anybody know the last black driver in the Daytona 500?

Answer: Wendell Scott, in 1969.

Yep, you read that right. 1969. Forty…nine…years ago.

And Sunday, Darrell “Bubba” Wallace, Jr. made a little history in Black History Month.

Congratulations, Mr. Wallace. This is a well-worn cliche, but even though you finished second, you’re definitely a winner.

That’s all I got today. Just wanted to shine a little spotlight on this man.

Take some time this month, or any month, to read up on some important folks whose lives we commemorate during Black History Month. Their history is very much part of ours.